The Radcliffe Red List of Endangered Crafts

 

Sail making

 

The making of sails for boats and other vessels, with specific reference to the hand-stitching of the rope around the edges of the sail.

 

Status Endangered
Craft category  Textiles
Historic area of significance  UK (coastal regions)
Area currently practised  UK (coastal regions)
Origin in the UK
Minimum no. of craftspeople required  50
Current no. of trainees  11-20
Current no. of skilled craftspeople  21-50
Current total no. of craftspeople  21-50

 

History

 

Techniques

 

Local forms

 

Sub-crafts

 

Issues affecting the viability of the craft

  • Technology: Sail panels have been sewn together with machines for 150 years. The majority of hand-sewing involves the edging and other details on the sails. Even where the sails are sewn by hand machines or by hand the design is usually computer-produced and sent to a computerised cutting machine. The parts come back as a jigsaw to be sewn in whatever way is decided. Apart from individuals making the odd sail, there are no firms dedicated to hand-made sails.
  • Market issues: Many people would like to have sails made traditionally, but very few are willing to pay the price of someone working eight hours a day hand-sewing. The exception might be a restoration project financed by public or charitable funds. The future will depend on builders and restorers of traditional boats being willing to spend the extra money for authenticity.
  • Training and skills issues: There are still people able to make sails by hand, but they are not being replaced as they retire. There is virtually no training, although some traditional sail making is taught as part of boatbuilding courses, usually by visiting tutors. A young person wanting to start in traditional sail making would need to join a mechanised firm that might have a branch doing traditional work, or find one of the few ‘old boys’ who still know the craft.

 

Support organisations

  • Association of British Sailmakers

 

Craftspeople currently known

 

Other information

Status: Sail making is considered to be vulnerable. While the numbers are relatively small (opinions differ as to whether there are 11-20 or 21-50 skilled craftspeople), there are a reasonable number doing it and while craftspeople may not be in their 20s, not everyone is over the age of 60.

 

References